To know the application linked to a specific port number in Windows XP

The best way to find the port number linked to any application is as follows:

C:\>netstat -ano |find /i “listening”
TCP 0.0.0.0:80 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 5000
TCP 0.0.0.0:135 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 1180
TCP 0.0.0.0:443 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 5372
TCP 0.0.0.0:445 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 4
TCP 0.0.0.0:2869 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 1392
TCP 0.0.0.0:24160 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 5372
TCP 127.0.0.1:110 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 696
TCP 127.0.0.1:1027 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 2780
TCP 127.0.0.1:2010 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 696
TCP 127.0.0.1:5152 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 236
TCP 127.0.0.1:5354 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 1860
TCP 127.0.0.1:27015 0.0.0.0:0 LISTENING 1832

Now, to check which application is linked to any of the above port, say port 80, you can open the Task Manager and click on process tab -> view -> Select Columns and select PID and click ‘OK’. From the above netstat output, you will see the process linked with port 80 is ’5000′.

Now, you can check the process 5000 on task manager to know which application is linked to the port 80.

Note: if you want to see listening, waiting, established ports with process id’s, you can issue this command: netstat -ano

Advertisements

Phone with Mobile Office as Modem

Few minutes back, I called up Airtel to know the settings for connecting my laptop to the Internet via my Airtel Mobile Office for Blackberry on my cell phone. The Airtel customer service guy said its ONLY possible with normal GPRS connection and not with the Mobile Office connection for Blackberry. I didn’t believe that though and asked him for the setting with normal GPRS connection.

Then, I enabled the bluetooth on both my cell phone and laptop and created a new connection from network settings using the following Airtel info for normal GPRS connection:

phone number: *99***1#

Leave the username and password blank

And then dial the connection. Boom! there you have the internet on your laptop. So, DO NOT believe whatever these Customer Service people say.. They just know what they are taught and won’t think beyond that.

RDP Error – No Terminal Server Client Access Licenses Available

Remote Session was Disconnected because there are no Terminal Server Client Access Licenses Available

You try to use remote desktop to connect with a server, one that you have always been able to connect with before, and instead of connecting with terminal services to get a remote desktop connection, instead you get this error:

“The remote session was disconnected because there are no terminal server client access licenses available for this computer. Please contact the server administrator.”

Solution

For administering a server, these licenses aren’t needed. You can run up to two administrative remote desktop logins at the same time, in addition to the physical keyboard and screen, (for a total of three desktop sessions.)

The solution is actually the following:

* First close the remote console and make a back-up of your registry on the workstation you are using to connect on the server.
* Second, delete this registry key using regedit on the computer you are using for connect on the server:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\MICROSOFT\MSLICENSING

* Start the remote console and try to log into the server…

Disk Space Analyzer Tool

No matter how much disk space you have, it will get used up. If you’re already feeling a pinch, it’s worth using a disk space analyzer tool to see what’s eating up your disk space. There are lot of disk space analyzer tool floating around, but the best according to me is the JDiskReport (http://www.jgoodies.com/downloads/index.html) which helped me remove unnecessary files/folders which were hanging around for the last 2 years and freed up like 3 gigs of disk space.